Biped Training

It was a Sunday and our visitors arrived in the morning. I was eight months old and I was very proud that my bipeds now trusted me to behave nicely when they answered the door and the visitors came in. I greeted them nicely, by politely sitting and waiting for them to make a fuss of me. My bipeds gave me beaming smiles, and a treat or two, because I was being so good.

We all went into the lounge and the adults sat down while my bipeds were bringing in cups of tea and coffee and snacks. One of the visitors was a teenage girl, who didn’t sit down. She was standing, talking quite loudly and waving her arms about a lot. She seemed to be in the way. I moved closer to see what she was doing. Her father said, “Sit down” and I sat very quickly, which made him chuckle and say, “You see, Clowie knows what to do, she’s better behaved than you are.” His daughter laughed and remained standing exactly where she was.

My bipeds were dodging round her and her father again said, “I’ve asked you to sit down, please – you’re in the way!” I looked across at him and back at her – she just carried on talking. He said, “Sit!” and I could tell from his tone of voice that he was becoming exasperated and was going to have to get up to enforce the command. So, I decided to help. She was standing directly in front of the sofa. I stood up on my hind legs and put my front paws on her shoulders and pushed her gently down to sit on the sofa. She looked shocked, but her father started laughing loudly and she soon joined in. He said, “There, Clowie has taught you how to sit today!”

I sat back down on the floor near to her, in case I needed to remind her to sit again. I was feeling really pleased with myself. And then I saw the look on my bipeds’ faces – maybe it hadn’t been such a good idea after all! They were embarrassed and they were busy apologising about my behaviour. I couldn’t see what I’d done wrong. All I’d done was save a biped the trouble of getting up to enforce a command and he certainly seemed to appreciate my help. I was relieved that I wasn’t sent to the kitchen in disgrace and that makes me think that, maybe, my bipeds were secretly pleased that I’d encouraged her to sit down, out of their way.

I later discovered that teenagers are a lot like Pyrenean Mountain Dogs; they usually understand what is being asked of them, but it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re going to do it!

See you next Wednesday!

36 Comments

  1. Oh Clowie I would to have you in my house to be my enforcer with the teenagers! You are right they do understand what we want them to do but it most certainly does not mean they are going to do it! I have two teenagers and there is usually one ignoring me at any one time and Stan often seems to be on their side as they also seem to carry a supply of food bribes. Good luck if you decide to try and help train the teenager you met – I don’t think it is possible really until they are older.

    • Stan is probably not taking sides at all, but trying to remain neutral – or near the best treats, depending how you look at it! I have seen food work very well on male teenagers, as they seem to need a constant supply. I’ll let you know how the training goes.

  2. Clowie I see a business model here – not only are you offering the pedicure procedures but now you are offering training lessons as well! Soon you will be as famous as that bloke on the telly who looks grumpy and keeps firing people! World domination here you come!!

  3. I think you did an excellent job Clowie you helped her sit down without a lot of fuss. You are a very smart girl and very pretty. Thank you for stopping by my blog and leaving a comment.

  4. Clowie,

    We like what you did. Paws on teaching is the best way. Furry head up.

    Bella and DiDi

  5. You can be now the Human Whisperer, you surely did a great job.

  6. ya…wellll…I’d take the Pyrenean Mtn dog over a teenager anyday! And I’m a cat…a scardy cat at that!!!!

  7. HooOOOOOOOOoooooWWWWWWWWwwwwLLLLLLLLLoooooooOOOOOO Clowie!! You are lovely and your blog is awesome! This is a brilliant post and I am still laughing my wolfie socks off some hours after first reading it 🙂 I think you’ll make a fantastic biped trainer!! Big Wolfie hug for you Clowie 🙂

  8. You should become a hooman trainer! You would make lots of money from desperate parents who need their teenagers trained!

    Last wheek whee our Mummy had friends over and they were grumpy so whee were forced to take action. Whee got out of our cages, along the floor and, to their horror, began climb their legs to enforce some manners. Our Mummy laughed and saved them before we did much more than headbutt a couple of chins but they did giggle too and soon cheered up. So we must have done something right!

    Bingo & Buddy
    xx

  9. Hiya Clowie. I just stopped by to let you know I have awarded to you the Liebster Award which was just given to me. The protocol asks that I pass the Award forward to 5 other blogs with less than 200 followers..I really appreciate your comments and your blog so wanted to give the Award to you but not sure if you have 200 or more…but if you go to my Monday blog post you will find your name, the Award protocols and badge for you to display if you want. Thank you for visiting with me, paw pats Savannah

  10. Thanks for visiting us! We stopped by several times to visit. Its always nice to hear from you!

  11. Hahahaha Clowie you are priceless! How are you with training other doggies? we could use your help over here!

    • I think I could do quite well at training doggies. I have a little doggy friend – they said she won’t go in water, not even a puddle. But when she went for a walk with me, she saw how much fun I had splashing in puddles and she was soon following me into them and enjoying splashing as much as I do!

  12. You are such a good doggie! Good for you for helping train that teenager

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